Andrew Seidman
By Andrew Seidman | SEM | August 18, 2014

Big Things vs. Little Things

When I play poker, I’m faced with a multitude of decision points. Some of them are big decisions – if I make the wrong choice, I’ll lose all of my money, but if I make the right choice I win lots of money.  Those are the ones that get put on TV, but most decisions are a lot smaller: how much should I bet here?  Should I pay to see the flop, or just fold now? Most people suggest that you should focus only on the big decisions.  Guess what:  in general, they’re right.

 

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The truth is that, if you’re messing up a lot of the big-picture stuff, the small-picture decisions won’t help you.  So what does this mean for your online sales strategy?

Think big: your website is the first impression people will have of your product.  A high quality, responsive website tells visitors (and search engines) that you care deeply about your product or service and that you’ve invested the time and effort to create a beautiful and presentable product. If you have items for sale, and you have pictures of them on your website, but you’re not eCommerce, ask yourself why not! Are you missing the “big” picture? Even if you don’t expect to sell a lot of units via your website as an eCommerce platform, what about in 2 years? How about in 10 years? With many of our clients, they’re interested in solving all of the little problems and avoid taking on the big (read: expensive) ones. There are lots of reasons for this: cost, difficulty (“let’s do the easy stuff first and worry about the hard stuff later”), focus (“we’re launching a new product so I don’t think it’s a good time”), etc.  However, there are always lots of reasons NOT to make a big change, and usually only one in favor: it’s the right thing to do.

With all that said, “big picture” people are right – but not by much. Having a game plan for simple best practices is necessary if you want to perform at peak capacity. Even if a great poker player wins every big pot, he’ll still lose if he makes a million tiny mistakes in the meantime. Don’t be the company that invests in a shiny new website and then neglects to rotate ads, adjust bids, post blogs, tweet, or do any of the other mundane (but increasingly important) tasks.  The little stuff matters too.

Last but not least, don’t expect overnight results. Digital marketing, like poker, is a math game with pretty significant variance. This is especially true if your product is low volume/high profit (lawyers or high-end specialty products).  You may go several months without any sales, but one month with 10 sales might put you in great shape for the year. So start with the big things, then work on the little things, and be patient.

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not built in a day

In business, like in poker, it’s all about the process. If your decisions have a sound basis, the results will eventually show up. Keep focusing on making good decisions (in the right order!) and your luck will turn up sooner rather than later.

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