Where someone lands when they get to your website could make or break a conversion. For the most part, people don’t want to click around your website when they’ve already typed in specific search criteria. There are several factors to consider for your landing pages:

Don’t Dig

Making visitors search around your site for what they came for, and what you promoted in your ad, is one of the fastest ways to get people to bounce. Headlines and subheadings help visitors scan blocks of text quickly. The content they expect to find should be located in the appropriate section. If the user cannot find what they are looking for quickly, they are going to bounce – right to your competitor.

SURPRISE!

Visitors seeing something unexpected or unrelated will also bounce them quickly. Let’s say you create an ad for “Dietary Supplements”, but when I get to your website, the page is promoting faster weight loss. Now the faster weight loss may be a benefit to the supplements, but I came for the supplements.

Oops! Wrong Audience

Sending the wrong people to your website is just as bad as sending the right people to the wrong landing page. Anyone with a budget can drive a ton of traffic to a landing page, but can you drive the right traffic? You’re looking for conversions, not visits. I discussed the importance of audiences in a previous blog here.

Errors?

Filling your landing page with poor grammar, misspelled words or unrelated images confuses people. If you’re careless with spelling, how can they count on you to not be careless with your product? Visitors are looking for any reason not to buy what you are selling. Don’t give them any more reasons than necessary. Make sure your content is spellchecked and images are relevant.

Content

Make sure the content on your landing page is of high quality. You want to quickly communicate to the visitor the following items:

  • You understand their problem
  • You have a solution that could be used to solve it
  • You stand behind your product/service

If a visitor feels they’re just going to waste they’re money they’re going to bounce – and fast! Humans now have a shorter attention span than a goldfish, according to a Microsoft study. You now have 8 seconds to grab their attention and get them to act, so make sure your content is as closely related to what your ad is promoting as possible.

It’s too hard

Any distracting elements can reduce the credibility of your site, which in turn will cause visitors to search elsewhere. Color on your landing page should be something you consider strongly, whether the background or the text color. Our own Angela Asca discussed the psychology behind color recently. In addition to reactions to color, people will act according to the font. While some fonts are interesting to look at, you don’t want them to be difficult to read.

Call To Action

Don’t clutter your pages with images – you need your call to actions to be simple and easy to spot. When a landing page is filled with distracting images, it lowers the readability and therefore increases the bounce rate.

Images are great, but should be combined with equally great copy that’s reinforced with visuals. You have 8 seconds to tell them you have what they’re looking for and direct them to the next step – keep testing!

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